Saturday, April 19, 2014

An update on this Easter weekend washout

It's late Saturday afternoon, and an update on what to expect for Easter might be in order -- especially many people will be attending sunrise services in the morning.

Obviously, the weekend so far has been a miserable washout. In fact, the spring break week for children in the area has been largely a bust.  That also goes for the original forecast for this weekend. If you'll remember, we were talking as late as Wednesday about 70 degrees (with clouds) for Saturday and sunshine and 70s for Sunday.

A low pressure system that was stronger than expected and slower than expected has ruined all that -- just like a cold high pressure system over New England ruined most of the outdoor plans for students last week.

We're approaching 2 inches of rain from this weekend's storm, and we've passed 4.5 inches for the month. That means April will make five of the last six months with above-average rainfall for Charlotte. Let's remember that the first time we have five straight dry, warm days, and someone starts talking about "drought."

So what about the rest of the weekend?

Easter Sunday will not start great.

Since the left-over moisture from the very slow-moving low pressure system will still be around in the morning, and we'll still have a cool northeast flow, I think daybreak will be cloudy, misty and cool (upper 40s).

Figure on the clouds hanging around all morning, then slowly breaking in the afternoon. It won't be a warm day, either. Those morning clouds and the northeast breeze will limit highs to the mid 60s, and that might be a stretch.

Temperatures today were more than 20 degrees below average, and they'll be 10 degrees below average Sunday, too.

In short, it'll be a great indoor Easter.

It looks like conditions turn warmer next week, and since the students will be back in school and most of us back at work, that figures.

Back in March, we said spring would be slow to arrive this year in the eastern United States. And it has played out that way. Cold air has been persistently lodged in the northeastern part of the country since January. Here in the Southeast, we've had brief warm spells over the past few weeks, but cold high pressure repeatedly has wedged its way into the Carolinas, and we've been visited by these cold rainy systems.

Until the pattern breaks, expect more of the same.

The good news is that the pattern has kept storm systems from moving up the Tennessee and Ohio valleys, for the most part, and that has saved us from severe weather outbreaks.


Anonymous said...

The best laid plans of mice and men...

Chaz said...

Endless rain. Endless flooding. Endless cold. Endless garbage weather.

At this point, I doubt anyone will complain of a drought. We could use about two months solid of warm, sunny, dust-dry, rain-less weather to dry up this nasty, perpetual muck.

And lastly, if these week's nice forecast was such a complete bust, how we we believe next week won't be either?

Anonymous said...

I for one welcome the April rain. I have newly planted tomatoes, roses. lantana, and tea olives. We will have a dry, humid, and hot summer. All you complainers will be wishing for theses cool rainy days.

Anonymous said...

That global warming thing should kick in any minute now.

Anonymous said...

Well then, go play in the soaking muck with your newly planted tomatoes.

How does one have a "dry, humid" summer? Will that be like the cool one last year, with rain every other day and temps only in the low 80's?

Let us first see if winter ends some time before June, then we will see if a "dry, humid" summer arrives to complain about. It seems impossible to imagine even three consecutive days of heat with no flooding rain.

Anonymous said...

These "forecasts" are almost always wrong. It's a beautiful morning - not cold, not misty, not cloudy. Steve - you don't have much credibility. Sorry.

Anonymous said...

It frightens me how many folks yell "so much for that global warming thing" every time we have a cold snap.

Anonymous said...

The weather guys have all this fancy equipment and they get the weather right about 50% of the time. In Charlotte, all you have to predict is cloudy with 50 % chance of rain and you will be right most of the time. Oh yea, and forecasters after two days of dry weather will start talking about a drought and the need for more rain. Go figure.

Anonymous said...

I can understand a wrong weather forecast five days in advance. But 15 hours later is just plain ridiculous. Who wouldn't be fired from their job if they were only accurate 50% of the time?

Steve - late Saturday afternoon you said Sunday morning would be dreary. News flash - it's sunny and pleasant.

Anonymous said...

YOU WERE WRONG--What a beautiful Easter Sunday
morning. I am sorry I read your online forecast.

Maybe it time you go back to whatever school
you learned weather forecasting from .

I am so sick of you guy's beefing up you forecast
to get people to read or in TV'S case to watch
to sell your paper or tv ads.

Have a nice Sunny Easter.

Anonymous said...

It amazes me that anytime we get rain the people start saying that their plans are ruined, and its horrible-- its rain people-- put on a jacket, go outside and do what you need to do-- or is it easier to serve up a big plate of cheese to go with the whine?

Anonymous said...

Y'all need to stop picking on Steve about his report! He has never said he's a meteorologist. He simply has a fascination for weather. For those you pouncing all over him, how come no one else is pouncing all over the National Weather Service for getting it wrong as well? The NWS forecast said the rain was supposed to end yesterday afternoon. And what happened? It wound up raining all night.

Some of you seriously need to get a life and just get out and enjoy the beautiful day we have before us instead of coming on here to complain like your life as been ruined! /:rolls eyes:/

Anonymous said...

Yes Steve - that sunshine was brutal this morning.

Anonymous said...

Be kind to these guys...they serve as comic relief. No one ever takes a weatherman seriously.